The Folly

For this assignment we were required to make 2 models, one being a folly and the other a piece of jewelry.

To form the basis of our model we used a program called TopMod. This was the first time I have used top mod and I had no idea what I was doing, so for the first few days I experimented, making various shapes.  I also found problems with the program, as it has bugs in it, the system crashes regularly, so saving one’s work on a regular basis, eliminated having to do the work all over again, also saving a lot of time.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Some of the first shapes were basic forms. From these forms I added handles, which could be twisted and made into various strange shapes.  I wasn’t sure at first what the outcome of each action would be, and found it hard to create a design that I had in my mind.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

After experimenting with various forms, I found that some of my designs were not suitable to be printed, they were not good meshes. I firstly checked this by saving the file as an STL file, and then I opened it up in Rhino. Once it was in Rhino I typed in checkmesh, and it informed me that it was not a good mesh, that it had holes in it.  As I was not familiar or very experienced with fixing these holes, I decided to continue making various models in top mod until I made a form that was a good mech.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Once Rhino notified me it was a good mesh, I had to adjust the scale of the model, one to be used as a piece of jewelry, and the other to be printed as the folly.  This was done by creating a 3D box, and typing in the dimensions.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I then opened it in another program called Magics.  This program is a software package that is used for the printing of models. In this program we had to check our mesh again, and once it gave us the green light, or straight green ticks, it was considered a good mesh and able to print on RMIT’s Zcorp Powder Printer.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I then had to send the magic’s file to Andrew to be printed on the Zcorp powder printer, with a jpeg copy of the checkmesh green ticks.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

After digital submission, I then decided to render it in Rhino. This was achieved by firstly clicking the render option on the perspective screen.  This created a monochromatic render of my object.  Once this was done, I then creating new layers, and clicking on the white circle, which brought up an extended render menu. In this menu I was able to colour my model, add textures and patterns and reflective qualities that made the model seem life like.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

After I rendered my model/jewelry piece, I then imported scaled people from a Rhino file and scaled my model up to suit the size of the people. I also scaled my model down to fit around the neck of the scaled people.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Once I finished rendering my model and the people, I imported it into Photoshop and placed my model into an environment that would suit my model.  In Photoshop I added extra touches such as shadows, highlights, etc, that made it look like it was sitting in the sun, on the beach.

3 thoughts on “The Folly

  1. Did you just take a screen shot from Rhino’s render preview viewport? You need to click the little blue sphere and render through VRay….

    Good TopMod process work tho.

    • Hi Jess

      I did click on the blue sphere and render through the VRay, i even made the picture size and quality larger so it would be a good quality render. Unfortunatly I have very bad Internet service were i live, i live in a part of victoria that was burnt out in Black Saturday and we still dont have good internet service, thererfor it wont allow me to upload large files, so i was only able to upload smaller reduced images onto the blog.

      Cheers

      Heath

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